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May 2020

April 2020

La. 3rd Circuit extends deadlines to May 18

Today the Louisiana Third Circuit issued an order extending its prior COVID-19 orders through May 15. Under today’s order, anything that would have been due between March 12 and May 15, 2020 will be timely if filed on May 18.

Like the First Circuit’s order yesterday, the Third Circuit’s order includes a “clarification” about briefing deadlines:  “]I]f an appellant's brief due date falls within the suspension period or the appellant's brief is filed within the suspension period, the appellee brief(s) will be due 20 days after the lifting of the suspension, June 4, 2020.”

For a copy of today’s order by the Third Circuit, follow this link.


Three orders by the La. Supreme Court

The Louisiana Supreme Court has issued two orders today and one yesterday responding to the COVID-19 emergency.

First, responding to Governor Edwards’s announcement of his extension of the state’s stay-home order through May 15, the Court has extended certain deadlines until May 18, 2020. Anything that otherwise would have been due between March 12 and May 15, 2020 is now due on May 18. To download a copy of this order, follow this link. This order continues and supplements the Court’s prior order of April 6.

Second, for other Louisiana courts, the restrictions on in-person proceedings have been extended until May 18, To download a copy of this order, follow this link. This order continues and supplements the Court’s prior orders of April 22 and April 6.

Third, yesterday the Court modified the rules for mandatory CLE credit this year by increasing the limit on “self-study” CLE to 12.5 hours. To download a copy of this order, follow this link

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p.s. Here’s a link to today’s press release by the Louisiana Supreme Court about yesterday’s orders.


La. 1st Circuit courthouse closed through May 15; deadlines extended to May 18

Today this announcement appeared on the Louisiana First Circuit’s web site:

EMERGENCY ORDER

Acting in accordance with Louisiana Constitution Article V, Section 1, the inherent power of this Court, and considering Proclamations Numbers JBE 2020-30 and 2020-41, Governor John Bel Edwards' extension of emergency provisions announced on April 27, 2020, the Louisiana Supreme Court Orders of April 29, 2020, and the state and federal health guidelines associated with the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic:

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the Louisiana Court of Appeal, First Circuit Courthouse shall remain closed through Friday, May 15, 2020, unless extended by further order.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that all deadlines set by this Court in all cases pending before this Court are HEREBY EXTENDED UNTIL FRIDAY, MAY 15, 2020.  All filings due during the period of March 12, 2020 through May 15, 2020, or which become due during this period shall be deemed timely if filed on or before Monday, May 18, 2020.

For clarification, if an appellant’s brief due date falls within the suspension period or the appellant’s brief is filed within the suspension period, the appellee brief(s) will be due 20 days after the lifting of the suspension, June 4, 2020.

Parties who are unable to file within this extended time may submit a Motion and Order with supporting documentation and argument requesting re-consideration of timeliness or other such relief.

THUS DONE AND ORDERED on this 29th day of April 2020.

VGW

I haven’t found a link to the order itself; I imagine it will find its way to the Louisiana Supreme Court’s web site within the next couple of days.

p.s. (30 Apr. 2020): Here’s a link to the First Circuit’s April 29 order.


U.S. Fifth Circuit offering live audio feed of oral arguments

Today I spotted this announcement on the U.S. Fifth Circuit’s home page:

Oral Argument Public Access

Members of the bar and the public may listen to a “live” audio feed from the oral argument proceedings being held April 27-30. See “Public Access Document” linked below for call in number and access codes. Access is limited to 100 participants at a time. The audio recordings will also be posted as usual the day argument on the oral argument recordings page: http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/oral-argument-information/oral-argument-recordings.

To read the “Public Access Document” with the call-in instructions, follow this link.


How to attend oral argument remotely at the La. 5th Circuit

The Louisiana Fifth Circuit has announced that it will hold oral arguments on May 5, 6, and 7 remotely using the Zoom platform. The court has also posted instructions for those wishing to attend an oral argument being held by video conference. To read the announcement, follow this link. To read the instructions for participating, follow this link.

p.s. For a copy of the Fifth Circuit’s “Zoom Docket” for May 5, 6, and 7, follow this link.


News at 4 p.m. from the governor’s office

The governor’s office has this announcement on Twitter:

Today at 4 p.m., Gov. Edwards will make an important announcement about the COVID-19 Stay at Home order and provide an update on the state's response to the coronavirus. 

JBE announcement

We’ll find out then what happens when the current stay-home order expires at the end of this month. Most people assume that the order will continue with some of its provisions relaxed. That, in turn, will inform the courts’ decisions on when to re-open. Stay tuned.


It’s one space, not two, between sentences.

Underwood

On this blog, I try to stay away from controversial issues. But sometimes progress requires controversy. So I’m here to give sad news to those who still put two spaces between sentences: the war is over; the one-spacers have won. MS Word now rightly flags two spaces as an error. (Hat tip to 600 Camp.)

I’ve been fighting this battle for years on my now-retired legal-writing blog. Long story short: your computer is not an Underwood typewriter. Therefore, the rules you learned in typing class don’t apply to word processing on a computer. That Underwood you learned to type on was capable of producing only mono-spaced text. The two-space rule you learned in high school was for mono-spaced text. Unless you’re a Luddite using Courier font, the text you produce with Word or WordPerfect is variably spaced, so the rules you learned for mono-spaced text don’t apply. (By the way, the same goes for ALL CAPS and underlining. If you’re still doing either of those things, please stop.)

See also these blog posts from 8 April 2014, 17 August 2011, 25 January 2011, 23 December 2006,  and 30 October 2006.